Antique Fine Mourning

Antique Vintage Victorian Gold Filled GF Rococo Mourning Hair Pin Brooch 8.5g


Antique Vintage Victorian Gold Filled GF Rococo Mourning Hair Pin Brooch 8.5g
Antique Vintage Victorian Gold Filled GF Rococo Mourning Hair Pin Brooch 8.5g
Antique Vintage Victorian Gold Filled GF Rococo Mourning Hair Pin Brooch 8.5g
Antique Vintage Victorian Gold Filled GF Rococo Mourning Hair Pin Brooch 8.5g

Antique Vintage Victorian Gold Filled GF Rococo Mourning Hair Pin Brooch 8.5g   Antique Vintage Victorian Gold Filled GF Rococo Mourning Hair Pin Brooch 8.5g
We have similar Rococo and Victorian items, which would pair nicely with this piece, for sale this week. Listing Description by: Angela A. Gram Weight : 8.5 grams.

Metal Type: 14k yellow gold filled over base metal, base metal pin stem. Brooch, lapel pin, hat pin, scarf pin, tie pin. Closure Type: Pin stem with an open "c" clasp, standard bale. Convertible to Pendant: This brooch contains a standard bale and can be worn on a necklace as a pendant. Handmade during the Victorian era in the Rococo, Momento Mori, and mourning styles.

Composed of 14k yellow gold filled over base metal. The body of the brooch features a center glass dome beneath which rests a lock of hair, expertly braided. Hair jewelry such as this was popular during this time period to remember loved ones who had passed away, as well as a reminder of one's own mortality.

Enamel in a deep black hue was hand-applied to the space around the hair. Elegant scrolling motifs in the Rococo style border the edges of the brooch.

A base metal pin stem and open "c" clasp completes the piece for comfortable and secure wear on a variety of accessories. Also contains a standard bale to be worn as a pendant on antique chains and necklace. There are two minor scratches on the glass covering the braided hair, which is not immediately noticeable when worn and does not affect wear. There is also light wear to the gold filled over base metal in some areas, exposing the base metal underneath. The price has been reduced to reflect this. This listing is for the item only. The Victorian era took place from the year 1836 to the year 1901, which was the span of Queen Victorias reign. Queen Victorias style was undoubtedly influential on the fashions of her country and ultimately led to three distinct jewelry trends emerging from the era. The first of these three styles was the Romantic period. The Romantic period was impacted by the Georgian period, which preceded it. The second period was the Grand period, which was primarily defined by mourning jewelry and the trends surrounding it.

The final period was the Aesthetic period. The Aesthetic period was more lighthearted and airy than the previous periods and focused on aesthetic beauty and joy. This era features floral, natural, and feminine motifs, and utilized chased gold designs, enamel, and seed pearls. The late Baroque or Rococo period prevailed in the 18th century.

The period was known for its substantial use of asymmetrical designs, curves, gold, and witty, whimsical themes. Both men and women at court wore sparkling gemstones set in gold during this period, as well as colorless glass pastes and pearls. Colored gems were often highly foiled behind them to enhance the depth of color.

Jewelry was often created with naturalistic, floral designs. Rococo jewelry also featured embossed and engraved floral and feather designs on metal. Mourning Jewelry has been around for hundreds of years but became especially popular during the Victorian era.

When Prince Albert died in 1861, Queen Victoria went into a state of mourning for over 40 years. She would often wear Black Memorial jewelry, Jet and Onyx. With the public seeing this, it rose immensely in popularity and soon enough was a staple of the Victorian period. Oftentimes, mourning jewelry included a relic from the deceased.

Memento Mori objects and jewelry were created to remind one of mortality. These objects of adornment, most often rings, are referred to as Memento Mori a succinct term reminding us of our transience on Earth, and a warning to prepare ourselves for whatever other realm awaits us. This type of item really gained popularity during the 1500s. The use of hair in jewelry has a long history throughout many of the worlds cultures, however, it was the Victorian era that saw a surge of popularity in this unique type of jewelry throughout Europe. Hair jewelry refers to any jewelry that features hair in some way, though more often than not these pieces are adorned with intricate hair work. Following the decline of demand for powdered wigs in the 19th century, wig makers and hair artists turned to jewelry as a way to utilize their talents. Hair jewelry was usually made using the hair from a loved one or friend and was worn as a display of love and affection. It was not uncommon for young women to have their hair made into watch chains or other decorative items to be given to their romantic interests. In addition to being an expression of love, hair jewelry was worn as a display of mourning. The Victorian era saw a rise in specific and unique mourning practices, popularized by Queen Victoria herself, and amongst these was the practice of wearing jewelry featuring the hair of a deceased loved one. Hair artists would often craft the hair into intricate and beautiful patterns in cooperation with jewelers and goldsmiths to create sentimental, beautiful jewelry appropriate for mourning. Hair jewelry was initially very popular amongst the wealthy, who could afford to commission hair artists and jewelers to create fashionable hair jewelry for them, usually featuring pearls and precious gemstones as well as lovely gold mountings.

It wasnt until the middle years of the Victorian era that hair jewelry became more accessible to the lower classes thanks in part to the introduction of magazine guides to hair craft and commercially available starter kits that included the tools necessary to create hair art at home. By the early years of the Art Deco period, hair jewelry fell out of popular fashion and pieces that have survived into the modern era are a true rarity, as well as a fascinating reflection of Victorian fashion and sentimentality. Enameling originally dates all the way back to the ancient Persians of Meenakari. The technique involves bonding powdered glass to a base, usually gold, by firing (heating and melting the glass onto the metal).

The glass hardens to form a layer of pigment over the metal. Enamel is made of colored powdered glass or may include clear powdered glass that is mixed with colorful metallic pigments.

It was used by the ancient Egyptians, Greeks, and Celts; and later the Chinese and Georgians. It resurged in popularity in the 20th century. It is primarily used on decorative art or jewelry, usually small in size.

Besides jewelry, enamel can also be applied to glass, ceramic, stone, and various other materials. The item "Antique Vintage Victorian Gold Filled GF Rococo Mourning Hair Pin Brooch 8.5g" is in sale since Saturday, January 2, 2021. This item is in the category "Jewelry & Watches\Vintage & Antique Jewelry\Fine\Victorian, Edwardian 1837-1910\Pins, Brooches". The seller is "abeautifultimeco" and is located in Fort Collins, Colorado. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  1. Country/Region of Manufacture: Unknown
  2. Material: Enamel, Glass, Hair
  3. Style: Mourning
  4. Brand: 14k
  5. Metal: Gold Filled

Antique Vintage Victorian Gold Filled GF Rococo Mourning Hair Pin Brooch 8.5g   Antique Vintage Victorian Gold Filled GF Rococo Mourning Hair Pin Brooch 8.5g